Guide Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression book. Happy reading Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression Pocket Guide.

Sonnet Retman

Crucially, the archive functions as a public repository, a space where many communities can freely access these interviews and draw upon them to produce new media and scholarship. Though it might be expected that a project of this sort would face obstacles at the intersection of technological and cultural practices—skepticism around technology or digital work, for example, or a sense that technical work is not cultural work—we have not encountered this in our collaborations between the university and community arts and social justice organizations.

Many of the women who have been interviewed for the project are enthusiastic about the ways that this technology might function to preserve and tell different stories about their work and lives. For us, though, our primary question is how we can best use technology to move our cultural project forward. When we began the project, its three planks developed organically: we taught a class in which students produced oral histories with artists and activists, and we organized a graduate mentoring workshop and conference that dovetailed with the class.

See a Problem?

We did not begin with designated roles beyond teacher, student, and organizer; moreover, we did not have a clear workflow plan in place. The Simpson Center funded the conference and assigned musician and organizer Quetzal Flores to our project as a liaison. Sociologist and hip hop scholar Dr. Mako Fitts Ward was a partner in the development of the first conference and became a co-founder of the WWR collective. We are gaining clarity about our various roles and our workflow as we move forward.

Like many public digital humanities projects, issues of labor, scale, and sustainability are our most pressing challenges.

Our classes explore the central role of women and popular music in the creation of communal scenes and social justice movements, and in personal and collective narratives of memory and history. This course supported the creation of a digital oral history archive that includes oral histories produced by our students. The class has since been transformed into a large, interactive lecture course. We have found that collaborative teaching is most effective: we each bring different strengths in terms of our training in theory, practice, and production.

Figure 3. Digitally documenting the Women Who Rock community altar Photo by Colleen Lenahan. Thus far, these courses have generated more than 50 oral histories and at least a dozen short-form digital projects, some of which are now featured in the WWR Digital Oral History Archive. Beyond these individual projects, students often become involved in the planning of the WWR conference or with the art and social justice organizations they have encountered in conducting their oral histories or attending WWR events.

They learn by doing. As our students embark on careers in media, technology, academia, arts, and social justice advocacy, they return to show their work and teach and mentor our current students.

Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression

In this way, the project has been generative for undergraduates and graduate students alike. Of equal importance, since , we have run a Women Who Rock Graduate Mentor Workshop, which is, in many ways, the heart of the project. The workshops provide an all-too-rare space for mentoring students, many of them women of color, whose research is not always legible within their own disciplines.

Such exchanges also strengthen intellectual collaboration at the senior level. These relationships continue beyond the workshop, in the form of advising and advocacy. Our doctoral students have received prestigious pre-doctoral and dissertation fellowships. They have successfully matriculated and been hired into tenure-track positions, going on to connect their local communities with WWR. These positive outcomes work against pernicious patterns within the academy.

We have witnessed this in a very real way. If some of the graduate students mentored by WWR have moved on to the next phase of their careers, others are just joining us. In our collaborations with community arts programs and social justice organizations, we have encountered activists, artists, filmmakers, and other cultural producers who were interested in graduate degrees.

Several have entered undergraduate and graduate programs in the past two years and will participate in the mentoring workshops. By creating an experimental platform for graduate students whose work is rooted in women of color feminist theory, WWR promotes the development of research that values community engagement and collaboration and public modes of scholarship and media production.

To be able to present to such an impressive gathering of artists, thinkers, students and scholars is truly a rare opportunity either on or off campus. At the same time, to receive such demonstrably generous and supportive feedback about my research and writing in progress is something that almost all graduate students crave, especially those of us engaged in non-traditional and feminist research. If only more students could be so lucky. Figure 5.

Photo by Angelica Macklin. Figure 6. Within WWR, the digital realm helps propel this epistemological transformation. What would digital scholarship and the humanities disciplines be like if they centered around processes and possibilities of social and cultural transformation as well as institutional preservation? If they centered around questions of labor, race, gender, and justice at personal, local, and global scales? If their practitioners considered not only how the academy might reach out to underserved communities, but also how the kinds of knowledge production nurtured elsewhere could transform the academy itself?

Lothian and Phillips cite WWR as a living model of transformative collective and collaborative feminist-of-color critique, an affirmative response to their lead question regarding the work of the digital humanities in creating new models of community-based, politically-engaged knowledge production In the following sections, we walk through the challenges and rewards of the WWR project in the on-going process of its evolution.

Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression | Princeton Alumni Weekly

The form of our exploration and its accompanying archive is just as significant as its aim. As the project deploys collaborative and synergistic methods of conducting popular music research, it advances a critical praxis that centers community-based knowledge production. To paraphrase new media scholar Tara McPherson in her WWR oral history, we flip the digital script by utilizing technology to build human infrastructure. Chicana and women of color feminist epistemologies, queer of color theorizing and feminista media frameworks provide the foundation for the project.

Figure 2. Photo by Scott Macklin. Performance scholar Tiffany Ana Lopez writes that the conference:. Program organization proved absolutely vital to the success of the conference and represented an ideal model for all of us to consider as it yielded one of the most productive, inspiring, and meaningful conference experiences in my twenty years attending such events. We often lose sight of the university as a place of possibility as well as privilege.

It is the space of possibility that the conference organizers consistently embraced and opened up with their adamant positioning of the university as a visionary meeting ground. We look forward to engaging in rich dialogues and laying the foundation for new kinds of communities. This emphasis on dialogue, experimentation, and open structure has helped us navigate tensions that have sometimes arisen in our organizing activities.

We all come from different locations within the university and the community—we are professors, graduate students, undergraduates, media scholars, filmmakers, musicians, artists, community organizers, librarians, archivists, and more. Each of us brings to the project different training, technological skills and interests, resources, and time commitments.

When we first began the collaboration among the University of Washington, Seattle University, and community arts and social justice organizations such as Ladies First and Seattle Fandango, there were occasionally misperceptions about the amount of resources available from the university and also the aims of the university-affiliated people involved in the project.

Community partners feared that the university might co-opt their work. It has shaped the everyday life of the project. On most Sundays, an ad hoc group of people gathered, kids often in tow, to do things like devise wording for our mission statement, craft a call for papers on a Google doc, and map out the structure and scope of our programming.


  • Real Folks;
  • Memoirs of crisis (1) RAM-EXIT.
  • Folk music.
  • Burgmuller, Czerny & Hanon: 32 Piano Studies for Technique and Musicality: 1.
  • What is Kobo Super Points??
  • n., v., rock (rŏk).
  • toikigotoma.gq | Real Folks (ebook), Sonnet Retman | | Boeken.

We divided up writing assignments, interview transcriptions, the film editing of oral histories, and other tasks. The everyday life of the project, then, includes these conversations along with production sessions, curriculum preparation, student recruitment and advising, participation in community and university workshops, attending performances, and hanging out. In so doing, we have made our own scene. Crucially, the archive functions as a public repository, a space where many communities can freely access these interviews and draw upon them to produce new media and scholarship.

Account Options

Though it might be expected that a project of this sort would face obstacles at the intersection of technological and cultural practices—skepticism around technology or digital work, for example, or a sense that technical work is not cultural work—we have not encountered this in our collaborations between the university and community arts and social justice organizations. Many of the women who have been interviewed for the project are enthusiastic about the ways that this technology might function to preserve and tell different stories about their work and lives.

For us, though, our primary question is how we can best use technology to move our cultural project forward. When we began the project, its three planks developed organically: we taught a class in which students produced oral histories with artists and activists, and we organized a graduate mentoring workshop and conference that dovetailed with the class. We did not begin with designated roles beyond teacher, student, and organizer; moreover, we did not have a clear workflow plan in place.

The Simpson Center funded the conference and assigned musician and organizer Quetzal Flores to our project as a liaison. Sociologist and hip hop scholar Dr. Mako Fitts Ward was a partner in the development of the first conference and became a co-founder of the WWR collective. We are gaining clarity about our various roles and our workflow as we move forward.

Like many public digital humanities projects, issues of labor, scale, and sustainability are our most pressing challenges. Our classes explore the central role of women and popular music in the creation of communal scenes and social justice movements, and in personal and collective narratives of memory and history. This course supported the creation of a digital oral history archive that includes oral histories produced by our students. The class has since been transformed into a large, interactive lecture course.


  • The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture?
  • The Forkyped.
  • Facing Athens: Encounters with the Modern City?

She is particularly interested in analyzing the meanings of racial representations as they bear on social relations of power. Her research and teaching examines a variety of cultural texts—including literary, cinematic and musical works—drawing upon an interdisciplinary methodology that culls from critical race studies, legal studies, feminist theory, cultural history, anthropology and literary criticism and theory. In her first book, Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression Duke , she investigates the racialized manufacture and contestation of the folk in the conjoined genres of documentary and satire in the s.

She is presently working on a book about the literary ethnographies of the s that registered the social effects of racial segregation to produce a counter history of the nation and its claims of democracy at the start of WWII.